RSS

Tag Archives: diet

Carrot Smoothie

Carrot SmoothieEver wondered why does a Carrot Smoothie always taste better when bought? Get so frustrated when you spend too much time preparing it and it turns out to be a “yuckie?”

Here is a simple recipe with a little twist.

 Servings
Quick MealQuick Meal
VegetarianVegetarian
Diabetes-FriendlyDiabetes-Friendly
Nutritional Info (Per serving):

Calories: 55, Saturated Fat: 0g, Sodium: 16mg, Dietary Fiber: 1g, Total Fat: 0g, Carbs: 13g, Cholesterol: 0mg, Protein: 1g

Exchanges: Vegetable: 0.5, Fruit: 0.5
Carb Choices: 1
 
Prep Time: 10 mins
Cook Time: 15 mins
Rest Time: 10 mins
Total Time: 25 mins

Ingredients

  • 1 cup(s) carrot(s), sliced
  • 1 cup(s) orange juice
  • 1 1/2 cup(s) ice cubes
  • 1/2 teaspoon orange peel, finely shredded

Preparation

1. In a covered small saucepan, cook carrots in a small amount of boiling water about 15 minutes or until very tender. Drain well. Cool.

2. Place drained carrots in a blender. Add finely shredded orange peel and orange juice. Cover and blend until smooth. Add ice cubes; cover and blend until smooth. Pour into glasses. If desired, garnish with orange peel curls.

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 4, 2013 in Education, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Superfoods for Your Diabetes Diet

A type 2 diabetes diet isn’t just about what you shouldn’t eat. Add these “superfoods” to give you an edge in managing diabetes.

By Dennis Thompson Jr.
Medically reviewed by Pat F. Bass III, MD, MPH
Original post here
Everyone knows you have to cut back on or eliminate certain foods once you’ve been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. But there are also foods that can help with managing type 2 diabetes, either by providing powerhouse portions of nutrients or by helping quell the ebb and flow of your blood sugar levels. “Diabetes ‘superfoods’ are foods that are low-fat and high in nutrients like vitamins, minerals, and fiber,” says dietitian Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, a certified diabetes educator and president of health care and education for the American Diabetes Association. Making these foods part of a comprehensive diabetes diet can make a real difference in managing diabetes.

beans for fiberBeans for Fiber

Incredibly high in fiber and protein, just a half cup of any type of beans will provide about a third of your daily requirement of fiber and as much protein as an ounce of meat. Because of this, beans are wonderful for managing blood glucose levels, giving the body nutrients to slowly digest and process. “They help control the post-meal blood sugar rise,” McLaughlin says. Beans also are great sources of magnesium and potassium.

fish for fatty acidFish for Fatty Acids

“Salmon, albacore tuna, mackerel, halibut, and herring are high in omega-3 fatty acids that have been shown to be heart-healthy, as long as these [fish] are not breaded and deep-fried,” McLaughlin says. One study also suggests that eating fish at least twice a week may protect people with diabetes against kidney problems.

nuts for healthy fat

Nuts for Healthy Fat

Nuts are very filling and contain high levels of unsaturated fats, the kind that contributes to “good” cholesterol. Some nuts and seeds like walnuts and flaxseeds contain omega-3 fatty acids. Nuts also deliver healthy doses of fiber and magnesium.

berries for antioxidantsBerries for Antioxidants

All berries contain good levels of antioxidants, McLaughlin says. They are heart-healthy, cancer-preventing, and fat-free. Compared with other fruits, “they provide a comparatively low amount of calories and carbohydrates considering their serving size,” McLaughlin says. Berries also contain vitamins and fiber.

broccoli for vitamins

Broccoli for Vitamins

High in vitamins A and C, broccoli is another low-carbohydrate, low-calorie, high-fiber food that has antioxidant and anti-cancer properties, McLaughlin says. Broccoli also is very filling, a plus for people who need to lose weight. “Try eating a six-inch salad plate full of cooked broccoli,” she says. “It will fill you up and give you 75 calories at most.”

seet potatoes for fiber

Sweet Potatoes for Fiber

Many people with type 2 diabetes love potatoes, but can’t afford the starch. Sweet potatoes are a great alternative, McLaughlin says. They are high in fiber and vitamins A and C.

leafy green for nutrients

Dark, Leafy Greens for Nutrients

Spinach, collard greens, and kale pack high levels of nutrients like vitamins A and C and calcium, and are low in calories and carbohydrates. Other great choices in this group include bok choy and mustard greens.

whole grains for bld sugar controlWhole Grains for Blood Sugar Control

Any time you want bread, pasta, or cereal, you need to make sure it’s made with whole grains. The germ and bran contained in whole grains have large amounts of nutrients like magnesium, chromium, omega-3 fatty acids, and folate; these are stripped out of wheat when it’s processed into white flour products. Whole-grain foods also contain lots of fiber.

tomatoes for lycopene

Tomatoes for Lycopene

Here’s another colorful vegetable that contains large amounts of nutrients like iron and vitamins C and E. Tomatoes are very versatile and can be used in many different recipes. Cooked tomato products like stewed tomatoes and ketchup also deliver the important nutrient lycopene, which gives tomatoes their red color and has antioxidant properties.

By Dennis Thompson Jr.
Medically reviewed by Pat F. Bass III, MD, MPH
Original post here
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Does Diet Affect Cardiovascular Strength and Health?

You bet it does!

  • One of the top killers in the world is cardiovascular disease (CVD), or disease related to the blood vessels of your heart. There are many types of CVDs that are responsible for death. CVD is responsible for more American deaths than cancer. It is a wonder that so many people die from cardiovascular disease, yet for many the chances of dying from it could have been reduced by two things: diet and exercise.

    The heart’s arteries are the vessels that carry blood to the body, while the veins make the return trip. Arteries and veins need oxygen and a clear path to perform their circulatory function. If there is anything that impedes their paths or causes the vessels’ walls to harden, the heart must pump harder and harder to get the blood going, creating unnecessary strain. With coronary heart disease, the leading cause of heart attacks, plaque forms along the cardiovascular walls and restricts the blood flow. The heart becomes overtaxed and some parts fail, causing a heart attack. So how does this deadly plaque form? It can be from the foods that you eat.

Plaque and Cardiovascular Health

  • When you eat foods high in saturated fat, you introduce harmful lipids and “bad” cholesterol (LDL) to the blood. Those lipids and cholesterol tear at your arteries. White blood cells try to get rid of the lipids. Unfortunately, platelets try to help by causing a “clot,” thinking the body is losing blood from the tear. When the platelets, white blood cells, LDL and lipids get together along with those torn artery muscle fibers, they form plaque. Over time this plaque builds up to the point where your heart is strained.

Good Heart Foods

  • Although saturated fats are part of a diet that can negatively affect cardiovascular health, there are healthful foods that can put a positive spin on your heart’s vessels. Research shows that dark chocolates, nuts and wines are foods that reduce LDL. Consuming foods that are high in Omega-3 fatty acids are another great way to keep your blood vessels in shape. Foods that contain Omega-3-like fatty fish- introduce acids that reduce fats in the blood vessels. Canola oil, soy foods and leafy greens also contain good Omega-3 levels. Although it is suggested that raising your good cholesterol (HDL) fights cardiovascular disease, there is no actual foods that have been scientifically proven to raise HDL.

    With a combination of moderate exercise and a good diet, you can prevent yourself from becoming a victim to one of the world’s top killers.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 17, 2011 in Education, Health & Medicine

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cinnamon’s beneficial effects on the body

Cinammon balances blood sugar and lowers cholesterol?

That lovely fragrance of cinnamon comes from the bark of the cinnamon tree, a moderately large evergreen that is native to Sri Lanka. It has been around for at least 2000 years. According to the Bible, Moses used cinnamon to make holy oil (Exodus 20:33). Legend has it that the emperor, Nero, burned a year’s supply of cinnamon at his wife’s funeral. Cinnamon, known botanically as Cinnamomum zeylanicum, has the ability to have a positive effect on blood sugar and cholesterol.

Aside from adding spice and being inexpensive and easy to obtain, cinnamon’s glory may lie in its ability to regulate blood sugar. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has published several cinnamon studies on human beings. Findings report that about one half teaspoon a day results in an impressive improvement in blood sugar. Cinnamon works by enhancing the body’s ability to use the insulin it already produces, especially in muscle tissue.

Cinnamon has also demonstrated a highly beneficial impact on cholesterol. Specifically, it lowers the LDL, more commonly known as the “bad cholesterol.”

Across the board, cinnamon is known to ease intestinal cramps, relieve gas, promote movement of food through the digestive system and act as a muscle relaxant. It has obtained some popularity as a method to relieve both menstrual and night time leg cramps as well.

Another helpful property of cinnamon is its antibacterial effect. It is especially useful for fighting intestinal germs. Some people claim it can ward off mild food poisoning.

The only form of cinnamon that is truly useful for humans is powdered bark, in capsule form. The oil contains compounds that can be harmful. Doses of 1000mg daily have been shown to make a difference in both blood sugar and LDL. 

Consumers need to know that the powdered cinnamon found in supermarkets is far too old to have any healing benefit. The most efficacious method for cinnamon intake is a commercial preparation designed for that purpose.

Although the oil can be harmful to humans if ingested regularly, it is useful in other ways. Just as cinnamon fights intestinal “bugs”, it also fights the real thing. A few drops of cinnamon oil on strips of white cotton ribbon, white cotton bias tape or plain paper towels hung in windows can be an effective insect repellent.

Cinnamon should be part of a daily eating plan, suggests A. Kahn, M.D., a diabetes researcher who has studied the effects of cinnamon on blood sugar. For the best effects, however, it takes more than a sprinkle on your morning oatmeal.

Kahn, A.Diabetes Care. December 2003; vol 26 (12): pp 3215-3218.
Qin, B., et al. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. July 2003

 
1 Comment

Posted by on August 19, 2011 in Education, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: